316–7, 316–17, or 316–317? Chicago Style for Number Ranges

In Chicago style, the answer to the headline’s question is 316–17 (with an en dash, although a hyphen is fine if an en dash isn’t handy).

Abbreviating number ranges according to The Chicago Manual of Style (per section 9.61 in the 17th ed.) is easy if you can remember these three rules:

1. For numbers up to 100 and for multiples of 100, use all the digits.

3–10
71–72
96–117
100–104
1,100–1,113

2. For 101 through 109, 201 through 209, etc. show only the changed part.

101–8
808–33
1,103–4

3. For everything else, use two digits unless you need more digits to show the changed part.

321–28
498–532
1,087–89
1,496–500
11,564–615
12,991–3,001

Bonus rule: Roman numerals are always given in full.

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Top photo: Cricket Scoreboard Numbers, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

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