Cartoon slash with googly eyes

Chicago Style Workout 63: Slashes

The punctuation mark that many of us know as the slash appears on standard computer keyboards. But even though it sits right there next to the period and the comma—and though it was once used as a form of sentence punctuation like those marks—the slash is comparatively uncommon today in ordinary prose.

Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart Newton entitled 'Portia and Bassanio' from Shakespeare's 'The Merchant of Venice' (Act III, Scene 2). Great Britain, 1831.

Chicago Style Workout 59: Who, Me?

Certain pronouns change their form depending on whether they’re used as subjects or objects. These include the pronouns “who(ever)/whom(ever),” “I/me,” “she/her,” “he/him,” “they/them” and “we/us.” The ones that cause the most trouble are the first two subject/object pairs.

Chicago Style Workout 55: US vs. UK

This month we’re doing something a little different. Instead of focusing exclusively on CMOS, this quiz highlights some of the differences between US style and UK style (commonly called British style). But we won’t be quizzing you on trunk versus boot or fries versus chips.