Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart Newton entitled 'Portia and Bassanio' from Shakespeare's 'The Merchant of Venice' (Act III, Scene 2). Great Britain, 1831.

Chicago Style Workout 59: Who, Me?

Certain pronouns change their form depending on whether they’re used as subjects or objects. These include the pronouns “who(ever)/whom(ever),” “I/me,” “she/her,” “he/him,” “they/them” and “we/us.” The ones that cause the most trouble are the first two subject/object pairs.

A wet, shaggy dog walks through a puddle

Taming Messy URLs

From the perspective of writers and editors, URLs do their best work behind the scenes or just off the page, in a browser’s address bar. In that role—as an internet address that will take you to a specific page online—it doesn’t matter all that much what a URL looks like so long as it works.

Navigating Spaces in Manuscripts and Beyond

To a copyeditor working on a manuscript, a space is usually just a space, and line breaks are random, fluid occurrences that vary as text is added and deleted and moved around. Designers and typesetters will take the edited text and make it pretty for publication, in part by applying different types of spaces as needed to prevent unwanted breaks.