Chicago Style Workout 9: Word Usage,
Part 1

tiny-swimmerDive in!

This month’s workout, “Word Usage,” centers on section 5.220 of CMOS. Writing and editing are more efficient when you never have to look up affect or effect or dither over whether it’s OK to write inasmuch.

Because the list of problematic words and phrases in section 5.220 is so long, we will revisit it regularly in the workout series. Today’s quiz focuses specifically on words beginning with the letter a.

Advanced editors might tackle the questions cold; learners can study those sections of the Manual before answering the questions.

(Subscribers to The Chicago Manual of Style Online may click through to the linked sections of the Manual. For a 30-day free trial of CMOS Online, click here.)

Note: Dictionaries and style guides sometimes disagree. These questions are designed to test knowledge of The Chicago Manual of Style, which prefers Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Other style guides may follow a different dictionary.

Chicago Style Workout 9: Word Usage, Part 1 (CMOS 5.220)

1. accusechargeTo accuse is less formal than to charge. Charged suggests official action.
a.  
b.  
2. affect; effect. Although both words can be a verb or a noun, affect is most often a verb; effect is usually a noun.
a.  
b.  
3. all (of). Of should be deleted whenever possible {all the houses} {all my children}.
a.  
b.  
4. alongside. This term, meaning “at the side of,” should not be followed by of.
a.  
b.  
5. altogether; all together. Both are correct spellings. Altogether means “wholly” or “entirely” {that story is altogether false}. All together refers to a unity of time or place {the family will be all together at Thanksgiving}.
a.  
b.  
6. amount. Synonym for number. May be used with mass nouns {a decrease in the amount of pollution} or count nouns {a growing amount of dissidents}.
a.  
b.  
7. and. {Grammatical theories have been in great flux in recent years. And the more we learn the less we seem to know.}
a.  
b.  
8. as far as. {As far as technology, it’s constantly changing.}
a.  
b.  
9. as such. {An agency had made all the arrangements months ago, and as such, they were nearly impossible to change.}
a.  
b.  
10. avenge, vb.; revenge, vb. & n. {Family grudges were privately avenged; they didn’t want justice—they wanted revenge.}
a.  
b.  

 

Previous Chicago Style Workouts

Photo: Lloyd Eller, son of Bob Eller, Digital ID npcc 01858, Reproduction no. LC-DIG-npcc-01858, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

 

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(Spoiler alert: Commenters may discuss the workout and their answers!)

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One thought on “Chicago Style Workout 9: Word Usage,
Part 1

  1. Regarding number 3, I used to usually delete “of” in “all of” constructions. But I began to question this practice. For example, in sentences beginning “All of the family wants …” “All of the students studied …” If you delete the “of,” the reader might initially read the sentence differently: “All [that] the family wants [is such-and-such].” “All [that] the students studied was [something]. Depending on how the example sentences continue, you might prefer to include the “of.”

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