Extreme closeup of part of a dictionary entry for the phrase "mass noun"

Chicago Style Workout 71: Nouns

There’s more to nouns than people, places, and things. Some nouns are countable, and some are not. Most nouns are common, but some are proper. There are mass nouns and collective nouns, attributive nouns and nouns that can function as verbs. Some even take on adverbial roles.

Two red squirrels on a birch log, making wishes.

Is the Subjunctive Mood Right for Fiction?

Although some believe that the subjunctive mood in English is dying, many of us use it all the time, whether we know it or not. And that means the subjunctive is right for fiction, even in the mouth of a character who wouldn’t know a subjunctive from a subplot.

Colon followed by a capital and lowercase letter "a"

When to Capitalize after a Colon

I don’t like to dither over style choices. At the beginning of a sentence, it’s routine to start the next word with a capital letter. But when I type a colon within a sentence, I often have to stop and think about how to write the next word: whether to cap it isn’t always obvious.

Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart Newton entitled 'Portia and Bassanio' from Shakespeare's 'The Merchant of Venice' (Act III, Scene 2). Great Britain, 1831.

Chicago Style Workout 59: Who, Me?

Certain pronouns change their form depending on whether they’re used as subjects or objects. These include the pronouns “who(ever)/whom(ever),” “I/me,” “she/her,” “he/him,” “they/them” and “we/us.” The ones that cause the most trouble are the first two subject/object pairs.