Chicago Style Workout 28: Grammar, Part 2

Check Your Balance!

This month’s workout, “Grammar, Part 2,” is taken from CMOS 17, sections 5.20–23. Advanced editors might tackle the questions cold; learners can study sections 5.20–23 of the Manual before answering the questions.

Subscribers to The Chicago Manual of Style Online may click through to the linked sections of the Manual. (For a 30-day free trial of CMOS Online, click here.)

Note: Dictionaries and style guides sometimes disagree. These questions are designed to test knowledge of The Chicago Manual of Style, which prefers Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. Other style guides may follow a different dictionary. 

[Editors’ note: Chapter 5 of CMOS is quite large, comprising 248 numbered sections on grammar and syntax, plus another hefty chunk on usage. For the sake of variety, we will revisit the chapter periodically in the workouts rather than continuously.]

Chicago Style Workout 28: Grammar, Part 2 (CMOS 5.20–23)

1. The genitive of a singular noun is formed by adding -’s {driver’s seat} {engineer’s opinion}.
a.  
b.  
2. The genitive of a plural noun that ends in -s or -es {parents} {foxes} is formed by adding an apostrophe before the s {parent’s house} {foxe’s den}.
a.  
b.  
3. The genitive of an irregular plural noun is formed by adding -’s {women’s rights} {mice’s cage}.
a.  
b.  
4. The genitive of a compound noun is formed by adding the appropriate ending to the first word in the compound {parents’-in-law message}.
a.  
b.  
5. Nouns denoting inanimate things can often take either the inflected form {the theater’s name} or the of-genitive {the name of the theater}.
a.  
b.  
6. When a double genitive is called for, use both of and a possessive form {an idea of Hill’s} {a friend of my grandfather’s}.
a.  
b.  
7. If two or more nouns share possession of the same item, the last noun takes the genitive ending. For example, Peter and Harriet’s correspondence refers to the correspondence between Peter and Harriet.
a.  
b.  
8. If two or more nouns possess something separately, each noun takes its own genitive ending. For example, Peter’s and Harriet’s correspondence refers to Peter’s correspondence and also to Harriet’s correspondence, presumably with all sorts of people.
a.  
b.  
9. If a noun and a pronoun are used to express joint possession, only the pronoun shows possession. For example, Hilda and his vacation.
a.  
b.  
10. Commas frame an appositive noun phrase, even when restrictive {in a conversation about songwriters, she pointed out that the poet, Robert Burns, wrote many songs}.
a.  
b.  

 

Photo: US Air Force photo by Senior Airman Anthony Sanchelli: “Nisha Morris works out during a physical training class designed to help women stay fit during their pregnancy, Feb. 17, 2012, at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.”

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