Chicago Style Workout 4:
Titles of Books and Articles

women boxing.nyplPunch up your editing skills!

Today’s workout, “Titles of Books and Articles,” centers on sections 8.166–78 of CMOS. Advanced editors might tackle the questions cold; learners can study those sections of the Manual before answering the questions.

Remember: The workouts are all about Chicago! If you’re an expert in MLA, AP, or New York Times style, you might be surprised to find that your instincts don’t quite match Chicago’s. That doesn’t mean that your answer is necessarily “wrong”—it just means it isn’t Chicago style.

(Subscribers to The Chicago Manual of Style Online may click through to the linked sections of the Manual. For a 30-day free trial of CMOS Online, click here.)

Chicago Style Workout 4: Titles of Books and Articles
(CMOS 8.166–78)

Note: These questions are designed to test knowledge of The Chicago Manual of Style. Other style guides may have different rules and guidelines. The first five items are true/false statements, and the last five ask you to judge whether the example does or does not follow Chicago style.

1. The titles and subtitles of books and periodicals are italicized.
a.  
b.  
2. Titles of newspaper articles are set in roman type and enclosed in quotation marks.
a.  
b.  
3. When newspapers and periodicals are mentioned in text, an initial the, even if part of the official title, is lowercased (unless it begins a sentence) and not italicized: She reads the New York Times on the train.
a.  
b.  
4. Generic terms such as foreword, preface, introduction, and index are uppercased and set in roman type in running text (I saw in the Preface that . . .).
a.  
b.  
5. Titles of short stories or essays are set in roman type and enclosed in quotation marks.
a.  
b.  
6. These connections are illustrated in table 32.
a.  
b.  
7. John S. Ellis’s article Reconciling the Celt appeared in the Journal of British Studies.
a.  
b.  
8. a volume in the Crime and Justice series
a.  
b.  
9. Clifford Garstang’s first novel has a chapter called “The Clattering of Bones.”  
a.  
b.  
10. I read it both in Time magazine and in the Wall Street Journal.
a.  
b.  

 

Previous Chicago Style Workouts

 

Photo: Manuscripts and Archives Division, Sports, Boxing, Women in Trylon and Perisphere Sweaters Boxing, New York Public Library Digital Collections, accessed February 18, 2016.

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